Some critics of the Green New Deal claim that the far-left wants to take away your hamburger -- but Silicon Valley startups may already have the win-win solution. Could cellular agriculture be the Green New Deal’s saving grace -- at least when it comes to meat? Photo by Luísa Schetinger on Unsplash
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You can have the Green New Deal and your hamburger, too

Some critics of the Green New Deal claim that the far-left wants to take away your hamburger — but Silicon Valley startups may already have the win-win solution. Could cellular agriculture be the Green New Deal’s saving grace — at least when it comes to meat?

This is the question Jan Dutkiewicz explored in the Guardian last month through an elegant exposition on why meat lovers need not fear the Green New Deal: you can have a clean planet and your hamburger, too.

After quoting Sebastian Gorka, who claims GND supporters are “trying to take your hamburgers like Stalin,” Dutkiewicz reminded us that Silicon Valley startups working on “clean meat” (i.e., alternative proteins) already have the solution — and the technology to realize it. US policymakers should invest in this technology as EU policymakers have already done, suggested Dutkiewicz, and “scaling up alternative proteins should form a backbone of the Green New Deal’s commitment to job creation, industrial innovation and food security.”

Cellular agriculture is another avenue by which greenhouse gas emissions produced by the sector can be drastically reduced while providing consumers — especially meat-addicted American ones — the flavor and texture of meat that they love. A bonus: no animals are harmed in the process, even though animal cells are at the core of the technology. Unlike alternative proteins (hint: the Impossible Burger), no cellular agriculture-based products have reached the market — and getting them there should be a focal point for GND-inspired tech-dev efforts and investments, argues Dutkiewicz.

Such technologies have consequences for ranchers, investors, and policymakers — and consumer attitudes toward such tech-enabled nourishment is no small part of the equation. Read the original article to find out whether cellular agriculture has a chance at redeeming the Green New Deal for some of its toughest critics.

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Embriette Hyde

Embriette Hyde

A trained microbiologist with over 7 years of experience in microbiome research, Dr. Embriette Hyde is passionate about bringing science to the public. She is currently working as Managing Editor at SynBioBeta and mentors K-12 students through Schmahl Science Workshops, fostering passion for science from a young age.

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